The Curse of Kirsha: Art, Race and Real Estate in New Orleans, part ii

The Curse of Kirsha: Art, Race and Real Estate in New Orleans, part ii

In part one of this series we talked about two recent racist New Orleans art swindlers: the AirBnB Queen, Muck Rock, and the deranged daughter of Pontalba prosperity, Ti-Rock Moore, who it appears had a hidden history as a crooked cosmetic dentist.

But rest assured, the metaphorical multimedia menhirs mounted by Muck Rock and Ti-Rock on our Artster Island stand atop a fundamental bedrock of bullshit laid by Kirsha Kaechele. Kirsha was the template, the original terrible vapid criticism-proof white lady artist rampaging through post-flood New Orleans. She’s a canny enough scammer that she’ll likely persist after all the simulacra she prefigured wither.

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The Curse of Kirsha:  Art, Race and Real Estate in New Orleans, part i

The Curse of Kirsha: Art, Race and Real Estate in New Orleans, part i

Blackness has long been attractive to edgy white American artists, but New Orleans seems a magnet for a certain kind of shameless, tone-deaf racist art scammer. In 2014, one wealthy New Orleans white woman in her fifties gave herself the name “Ti-Rock Moore” and launched a successful art career founded on depicting Black suffering and racist imagery.

In an interview with nola.com arts writer Doug MacCash, Moore said her “privileged” white upbringing gives her an “acute” perspective on American racism. Moore made news in 2015 when some less acute viewers took issue with her life-size rendering of Ferguson police-violence victim Michael Brown’s corpse, which she’d arranged face-down on an art gallery floor. Condemnation came from many quarters, including Brown’s father, who called the artwork “disgusting.”

Moore was unfazed. “I know how necessary this art installation is,” she said. “I know it’s important.”

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WEB EXCLUSIVE: Council of the Underground Parades

WEB EXCLUSIVE: Council of the Underground Parades

The Shotgun is thrilled to present an exclusive and entirely real roundtable with honored representatives from Eris, Witches and Heiress, three of downtown’s most notorious underground parades. Eris has been around since 2005, with Witches coalescing in 2012 and Heiress forming in 2013 in the wake of (and partly in reaction to) the 2011 NOPD assault on Eris. We spoke to these anonymous spokesfolx about how their no-throwing bullshit parades have been adapting to the changing landscape of New Orleans.

 



SHOTGUN: Can you start us off by describing your 2019 theme?

ERIS: Our theme for the year is “The Triumph of Safety.” It’s what we spend the bulk of our meetings obsessing neurotically over, and of course Eris is the Goddess of playing it safe.

That said, there were some within Eris who felt “The Splendor of Silent Respect” was an important theme, and since we’re all pathologically conflict-averse we did our best to accommodate that by folding these themes into one another, like a beautiful lacework polyhedron woven by iridescent caterpillars wearing tiny flower crowns.

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